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Powwows & Rodeos: Communities at Play by Harry Lee Harpster Jr.
September 28 - December 15, 2018

Harry Lee Harpster Jr.’s photographs engage viewers with late 20th-century Native American culture on the northern plains. Harpster’s black and white images illustrate the beauty and challenges of reservation life and lands. Intimate photographs of Native American children and adults featured in this exhibition were taken during visits to powwows and rodeos between 1979 and 2001. Harpster captured encampment scenes, preparations for parades and dancing, booths and vendors, spectators and competitors. Sponsored by the Hockaday Museum of Art in Kalispell, MT, this travelling MAGDA exhibition will be on display in the Wylder Gallery at Paris Gibson Square Museum of Art until December 15 at The Square.


News of the World: Stephanie J. Frostad
September 20, 2018 - February 4, 2019

News of the World: Stephanie J. Frostad
September 20, 2018 - February 4, 2019

Please join us for a special Reception and Artist Talk on Thursday, November 15 from 5-7pm.
Stephanie J. Frostad’s latest work will be on view in the Mungas/Volk Gallery through the new year. In News of the World, Frostad visits narratives that include Norse mythology, biblical symbols and references to contemporary issues. Most of these works focus on ravens and the natural world and in many, human subjects appear in the background of her detailed paintings, flushing out the meaning of the individual work. Frostad states, “….in stories and paintings, songs and plays we encounter themes that are relevant for every generation, even as circumstances change. This is one reason I am drawn to history, mythology and folklore as I investigate my current interests. Imagery and allegories of other times and places continue to illuminate our lives today.” A series of sketches, in pencil, inkwash and paint are displayed on a wall inviting the viewer to look more closely at the artist’s process. Referring to the title, the artist explains, “In Norse mythology the god Odin appears with animal companions, including two wolves and two ravens, Hugin and Munin. The name Hugin means Thought, while Munin has been variously interpreted as Memory, Emotion or Desire. Each day, these birds would fly out to gather news of the world and report back to Odin. I love the notion that ravens might be engaged in such reconnaissance. What’s more, this legend aligns with what we know scientifically about the capacity of ravens to learn, reason, communicate and remember. I consider these borrowed characters as witnesses who bring historical consciousness and reason to what they observe.”

Frostad studied at Studio Arts Center International in Florence, Italy where she began painting in 1985. She received a BFA from the Maryland Institute, College of Art in 1990, and in 1994 completed an MFA in Painting at The University of Montana. In 2017 Frostad was recognized with an Artist’s Innovation Award from the Montana Arts Council, an agency of State Government, through funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Born and raised in Walla Walla, Washington, Stephanie J. Frostad’s studio is now nested in her Missoula, Montana home.

Please join us at The Square as we celebrate with an Reception and Artist Talk on Thursday, November 15, from 5:00-7:00 P.M. Meet the artist and experience her works while enjoying complimentary beverages and appetizers.


Art Auction After Sale
September 20 – December 1, 2018

Enjoy paintings and sculpture jurried into The Square’s 21st annual Art Auction that are included in an after-sale through the month of November. 15 works representing 13 artists are on display in the Dufrense/Cobb Gallery.

Cabin in the Woods
Monoprint
Art Deco Train

Image Credits Top Left to Right:


Cottonwoods & Color: Edd Ender’s West
October 22, 2018 - March 25, 2019

Cottonwoods & Color: Edd Ender’s West
October 22, 2018 - March 25, 2019

Cottonwoods & Color features 14 large oil paintings by Livingston, Montana artist Edd Enders.  The viewer finds themselves swept across Montana landscapes strewn with cottonwoods, fences and telephone lines.  The color and movement in Ender’s work is spellbinding.  “My work is inspired by everything around me.  As I travel around the West, I see things compositionally; how shapes and colors interact.  When a scene moves me—emotionally or visually–I gather information with a sketch and notes.  Back in my studio, I use the sketch as a starting place for my oil paintings and choose colors, often abstract, to convey the mood or meaning I want to evoke.  My intended statement is often more ominous than my vivid colors suggest.  While painting, I focus on composition and fit shapes and colors together like puzzle pieces. I often use iconic imagery like roads, crows, fences, and road signs to add both visual interest and symbolism.  A crucial part of my painting process is the time I contemplate the puzzle of my next painting while building, stretching, sizing, and priming canvases.  I consider myself a contemporary western painter.  I’m not interested in portraying the West as it’s commonly idealized with pristine landscapes and romanticized wildlife, cowboys and Indians. I am deeply connected to the western environment where I’ve grown up, worked, and lived.  I want to portray human’s inevitable activity and impact on this region.  In the bigger picture, I hope that in 100 years people will look at my paintings and learn something about this place and time, as I see it.”

Livingston Montana native Edd Enders was born in 1962, graduated from Park High, and studied art at Montana State University, Bozeman from 1990-1993.  Growing up, he spent his free time outdoors observing nature, drawing, camping, and hunting.  As a young man he worked on archeological survey teams throughout the West and as a hunting guide, packer, wrangler and cowboy from Alaska to Arizona. Enders has been painting since 1989 and has been a prolific full-time painter for two decades.  Widely admired, Enders has collectors ranging from New York to Key West to Chicago to Shanghai and has shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions.


Spectacles, Tophats & Ties: David Driesbach Prints
October 24, 2018 – January 15, 2019

Spectacles, Tophats & Ties: David Driesbach Prints
October 24, 2018 – January 15, 2019

Spectacles, Tophats & Ties: David Driesbach Prints features an incredible variety of this prolific artist’s work on loan from the North Dakota Art Gallery Director’s Association, NAGDA. In 2014-15, Minot State University received a remarkable donation from the internationally known printmaker David Driesbach. A master of visual storytelling, David’s work often draws upon his own life experiences, dreams, and imagined dramas. Colorful characters float across surreal and dreamlike scenes. Some prints hearken back to his experiences in the South Pacific during World War II, while others are more humorous recounting events such as his home phone number was one digit different than the local pizza place when he taught at Northern Illinois University. David often puts himself right in the middle of the story with round spectacles, a top hat, and a tie (a personal homage to his wife). Viewers find numerous Little Orphan Annie cartoons, American currency, and appropriations from the history of art throughout many of his pieces. With these recurring themes and imagery. David has an unmistakable style that spans back to the earliest work in the collection from the early 1950’s.